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WOMEN'S WALL

famous women


Women are facing the same problems today they have faced for centuries: Blocked opportunity, equal pay, and equal access to health care are major problems worldwide. Women are simply not being allowed to participate equally human society even though they are an equally intregal part of it. Something is horribly wrong.

Women have lost health choices throughout the US, Middle East, and elsewhere. The inablility to recieve a living wage has thrown many women into dependence on the state or abusive marriages. Right where misguided misogynists want them.

All this flies in the face of the fact that societies that promote gender equality have a much higher standard of living than those that do not. Women's voices in the US led to the abolition of child labor, the development of public education, and better conditions for adult labor. Women's issues are human issues.

Below are links to stories about women living day-to-day at different times in different cultures. They are arranged in the order in which they were recieved. Please send you own story to leftopentn@gmail.com

voice
Nina & "Chore Girl"

A 12 year old girl asks why there is a cleaner called "Chore Girl" and no "Chore Boy"...



Dr Jill Stein

The Green Party's 2016 candidate for US president...



The Radical Work of Healing: Fania and Angela Davis on a New Kind of Civil Rights Activism

Angela Davis and her sister Fania Davis were working for social justice before many of today’s activists were born. From their childhood in segregated Birmingham, Alabama...



Willa B. Eslick
Tennessee's First Congresswoman

In June 1932, Willa B. Eslick watched as her husband, Representative Edward Eslick, collapsed on the House Floor while speaking in support of the Patman Veterans' Bonus Bill. A moment that otherwise would have been a high point of the four–term Congressman's career instead turned tragic. Willa Eslick soon became the latest widow to succeed her husband. In completing the final fraction of Congressman Eslick's term in the 72nd Congress (1931–1933), she supported legislation to alleviate the economic woes of Depression–stricken farmers and to combat concerns of internal subversion...



Cody's Mom

Overcoming health challenges and more...



Kate Stockton

Tennessee's first female gubernatorial candidate and early Socialist...



Women Thrive

A site that gets it. Women's issues addressed worldwide...



A Native [US aboriginal] Reflection On International Women’s Day

Today is International Women’s Day, and I expect to see a great many posts about women who have changed the world. And even though I am sure there will be an unfortunate tendency to lift up accomplished, American white women...



The Socialist Origins Of International Working Women’s Day

Over 100 years have passed since the first International Women’s Day was organized...



10 Female Revolutionaries That You Probably Didn't Learn About In History Class

We all know male revolutionaries like Che Guevara, but history often tends to gloss over the contributions of female revolutionaries that have sacrificed their time, efforts, and lives to work towards burgeoning systems and ideologies...



The Radical Dissent Of Helen Keller

How many realize that Helen Keller supported Socialist principles?



Radical Brownies

These Oakland girls aren't your mother's Brownies. Disassociating with the regular Girl Scouts, they pursue social justice as they learn about America's past struggles...



Katherine Johnson
The Girl Who Loved To Count

This African-Amerian woman calculated Alan Shepard's space flight for NACA/NASA...



DR Paula A. Johnson

Wellesley College Names First African American President...



Shirley Chisholm
Congresswoman

Shirley Chisholm became the first African-American congresswoman in 1968. Four years later, she became the first major-party black candidate to make a bid for the U.S. presidency...



Helen Caldicott

Helen Mary Caldicott is an Australian physician, author, and anti-nuclear advocate who has founded several associations dedicated to opposing the use of nuclear power, depleted uranium munitions, ...



Chief Wilma Pearl Mankiller

Wilma Mankiller worked for several years as a leading advocate for the Cherokee people, and became the first woman to serve as their principal chief in 1985...



Dolores Huerta

Dolores Clara Fernández Huerta is an American labor leader and civil rights activist who was an early member of the National Farmworkers Association, which later became the United Farm Workers...



María de las Mercedes Barbudo

María de las Mercedes Barbudo was a Puerto Rican political activist, the first woman Independentista in the island, and a freedom fighter...



Zora Neale Hurston

Zora Neale Hurston is considered one of the pre-eminent writers of twentieth-century African-American literature. Hurston was closely associated with the Harlem Renaissance and has influenced such writers as Ralph Ellison, Toni Morrison, Gayle Jones, Alice Walker, and Toni Cade Bambara...



Alice Paul

Alice Paul was the architect of some of the most outstanding political achievements on behalf of women in the 20th century. Born on January 11, 1885 to Quaker parents in Mt. Laurel, New Jersey, Alice Paul dedicated her life to the single cause of securing equal rights for all women...



Rosa Luxemburg

In 1889, at 18 years old, Luxemburg's revolutionary agitation forced her to move to Zürich, Switzerland, to escape imprisonment. While in Zürich, Luxemburg continued her revolutionary activities from abroad, while studying political economy and law; receiving her doctorate in 1898...



Dorothy Ray Healey

Born Dorothy Harriet Rosenblum in 1914 to Hungarian Jewish immigrants, Healey embraced the Communist Party in Los Angeles at 14 and rose through the ranks, becoming its chairwoman in Southern California. A labor organizer, civil rights activist, radio commentator, and one of the first union leaders to advocate for the rights of Chicanos and Blacks as factory and field workers, she remained a party faithful until 1973, long after she had begun to disagree with its orthodoxy and criticized it publicly...



Carol Moseley Braun

She was the first and to date only African-American woman elected to the United States Senate, the first woman to defeat an incumbent senator in an election, and the first and to date only female Senator from Illinois. From 1999 until 2001, she was the United States Ambassador to New Zealand...



The Rad History Book Every Girl (and Boy) Should Have on Their Bookshelf

Three Iron Man movies. Five Spider Man movies. Eight Batman movies. Nine Superman movies. Movies starring Daredevil, the Hulk, Ant-Man, Captain America, Thor, Green Lantern, and Ghost Rider. Meanwhile millions of girls are left to wonder if there will ever be a Black Widow movie...



All-female Kurdish unit takes on ISIS

CNN video - An all-female unit in the Kurdish armed forces takes on ISIS in Syria. CNN's Ben Wedeman reports.



Raising The Next Generation Of Female Political Leaders
A documentary by Kiley Lane Parker

Raising Ms. President is a documentary film about raising the next generation of female political leaders. Filmmaker Kiley Lane Parker explores the reasons why women don’t run for office, where political ambition begins, and why we should encourage more women to lead...



Emma Goldman

Emma Goldman dedicated her life to the creation of a radically new social order. Convinced that the political and economic organization of modern society was fundamentally unjust, she embraced anarchism for the vision it offered of liberty, harmony and true social justice. For decades, she struggled tirelessly against widespread inequality, repression and exploitation.



Sarah Jane Woodson Early

Educator, activist, and the first African American female college instructor, was born in Chillicothe, Ohio. Early graduated from Oberlin College in 1856, one of the first African American female college graduates. She was hired by Wilberforce University in 1858 to teach English and Latin and to serve as lady principal and matron...



Women-Led Movements Redefine Power, From California To Nepal

In the face of growing corporate power, land grabs, economic injustice, and climate change, women’s movements offer a paradigm shift. They have redefined leadership and development models, connected the dots between issues and oppression, prioritized collective power and movement-building, and critically examined how issues of gender, race, caste, class, sexuality, and ability disproportionately exclude and marginalize...



Rebecca Lee Crumpler
First African American Woman Doctor

Rebecca developed a strong compassion for the sick at a very young age, and learned to care for ill patients...



Inside The UK’s Women’s Equality Party

London, United Kingdom - If women had access to the same employment opportunities and salaries as men, London’s economy would gain approximately $55bn, according to the Women’s Equality Party (WE)...



Argentina: 6 Indigenous Women At Heart Of Fracking Resistance

Six Mapuche women have taken the risk of putting their bodies on the line to stop the drilling rigs from further endangering their community...



10 Fascinating Female Rulers In History

How many have you heard about?...



Visionary, Defiant And Resilient: Bahrain’s Dissenting Women

For decades, but especially since the uprising of 2011, Bahrain housed a call for democracy and fundamental rights, which consequently led to thousands of people [being] jailed and tortured – some even to death.



Shirley Graham Du Bois

Shirley Graham Du Bois (November 11, 1896 – March 27, 1977) was an American award-winning author, playwright, composer, and activist for African-American and other causes. In later life she married the noted thinker, writer, and activist W. E. B. Du Bois. The couple became citizens of Ghana in 1961 after they emigrated to that country. She won the Messner and the Anisfield-Wolf prizes for her works.



Grace Harper

Grace Brewster Murray Hopper (née Murray; December 9, 1906 – January 1, 1992) was an American computer scientist and United States Navy rear admiral.[1] In 1944, she was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer [2] and invented the first compiler for a computer programming language.[3][4][5][6][7] She popularized the idea of machine-independent programming languages, which led to the development of COBOL, one of the first high-level programming languages.



Tamara Franklin

[Tamara Franklin is from Knoxville, TN]

Elevated to Executive Vice President of Digital at Scripps Networks Interactive in January 2014, Tamara Franklin oversees the company’s digital business units to coordinate overall strategy and activity,focusing on an integrated company-wide approach to digital video production and distribution.




Equality